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Standards

This is an H3

Sun safety education can be woven into existing lesson plans that address content standards. While sun safety can be taught in any subject area, the two subjects that best accommodate it are science and health. Below you will find the sections of the Science Framework and Health Framework for California Public Schools in which sun safety lessons might be integrated. Following each standard are recommendations from Sun Safe Schools on how to integrate sun safety into each one.

Common Core and Sun Safety

Selected Science Standards for California Public Schools

Selected Health Framework for California Public Schools


Selected Science Standards for California Public Schools

Below you will find the sections of the Science Framework for California Public Schools in which sun safety lessons might be integrated. Following each section are recommendations from Sun Safe Schools describing ways to integrate sun safety lessons with each of the standards.

Kindergarten
STANDARD:

Talk to students about how the sun can damage skin. Talking about skin cancer may scare children, but most children can identify with the pain of a sunburn. Just like they change clothes depending on how the weather changes, they can wear different clothes to protect themselves from the sun. Weather observations might include looking at the EPA’s UV Index. Students can understand that on days with a high number, they need to be more aware of wearing sun protective clothing.

Grade 1
STANDARD:

While observing what kind of weather makes the earth warm or cool, also study the kind of weather that increases or decreases UV rays. The change in UV level of a sunny or cloudy day can be demonstrated using UV cards or beads that change color when exposed to UV rays.

Grade 3
STANDARD:

Another kind of energy that comes along with visible light from the sun are ultraviolet rays. They are invisible, but their effects can be seen with UV cards or beads that change color with exposure to UV rays. Include a discussion about how some energy from the sun helps plants make energy, while some exposure can cause damage to our skin.

Blocking visible light also means blocking UV rays. Talk about how shadows are made by blocking sunlight. These shadows create shade, the safest place for students to play during the day. Students can also block sunlight from reaching their skin by wearing cover-up clothing and wearing sunscreen.

As the angle of the Earth to the sun changes with the seasons, the UV exposure of your city also changes. UV exposure is less during the winter in the northern hemisphere because the Earth tilts farther away from the sun. It is still important for students to take caution no matter what season it is. Throughout the year, students can track the UV Index through seasons to observe the difference in UV exposure based on the angle of the Earth on its axis.

Grade 6
STANDARD:

Another example of energy transfer through radiation can be evidenced in sunburns. Most students understand that they do not need to touch the sun to get a sunburn. In fact, they are burned not by the radiation of heat from the sun, but by the radiation of ultraviolet. Ultraviolet radiation does not carry heat, but carries the energy necessary to damage skin as evidenced by sunburn and later in life by wrinkles, cataracts or even skin cancer.

Ultraviolet light has a slightly shorter wavelength than visible light and is directly adjacent to visible violet light on the electromagnetic energy spectrum. Within the UV spectrum, there are different types of UV light. UVA is not absorbed by the stratospheric ozone (O3) layer, UVB is mostly absorbed, and UVC is completely absorbed. The UVA and UVB rays that do make it to earth are capable of damaging skin. Sunburns and tans are the most immediate response of the skin to skin damage, but wrinkling, cataracts and even decreased immune system are also results.

Science Standards Grades 9-12: Physics
STANDARD:

Ultraviolet radiation is an example of a light wave. UV rays can be transmitted from the sun, through the vacuum of space, to earth. UV rays are just outside of the visible spectrum of light waves, but evidence that they exist can be seen in the manifestation of sunburns and tans. Later in life, the damage can also appear as wrinkled skin, premature aging, cataracts, and even skin cancer. To protect their bodies from excessive UV radiation, talk to students about the need for cover-up clothing, seeking out shade when they are outdoors and using sunscreen.

Science Standards Grades 9-12: Earth Science
STANDARD:

Although the stratospheric ozone layer is capable of absorbing some UV rays, all UVA and some UVB rays still make it to earth. On earth they can be reflected off of cement, snow, sand and other materials. UV rays can also be absorbed by plants and animals, including humans. When UV rays are absorbed by skin, skin damage occurs.

While talking about the disappearance of the ozone layer, discuss the effect that UV radiation has on animals and plants. In animals, including humans, increased exposure to UV radiation results in an increased risk of skin cancer. While we can make environmental changes to decrease the disappearance of the ozone layer, students should also take personal precautions like wearing cover-up clothing, sunglasses, sunscreen and seeking shade against excessive UV radiation.

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Selected Health Framework Guidelines for California Public Schools

Below you will find the sections of the Adobe Acrobat Health Framework for California Public Schools in which sun safety lessons might be integrated. Following each section are recommendations from Sun Safe Schools describing ways to integrate sun safety lessons with each of the standards.

Expectation 1: Students will demonstrate ways in which they can enhance and maintain their health and well-being.

Expectation 2: Students will understand and demonstrate behaviors that prevent disease and speed recovery from illness

Expectation 3: Students will practice behaviors that reduce the risk of becoming involved in potentially dangerous situations and react to potentially dangerous situations in ways that help to protect their health.

Expectation 4: Students will understand and demonstrate how to play a positive, active role in promoting the health of their families.

Expectation 5: Students will understand and demonstrate how to promote positive health practices within the school and community, including how to cultivate positive relationships with their peers.

Expectation 8/9: Students will identify information, products, and services that may be helpful or harmful to their health

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